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Research Papers

Study of Impact-Induced Mechanical Effects in Cell Direct Writing Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic Method

[+] Author and Article Information
Wei Wang, Yong Huang, Mica Grujicic

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634

Douglas B. Chrisey

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 130(2), 021012 (Mar 28, 2008) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2896118 History: Received May 03, 2007; Revised February 10, 2008; Published March 28, 2008

Biomaterial direct-write technologies have been receiving more and more attention as rapid prototyping innovations in the area of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and biosensor∕actuator fabrication based on computer-aided designs. However, cell damage due to the mechanical impact during cell direct writing has been observed and is a possible hurdle for broad applications of fragile cell direct writing. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact-induced cell mechanical loading profile in cell landing in terms of stress, acceleration, and maximum shear strain component during cell direct writing using a mesh-free smooth particle hydrodynamic method. Such cell mechanical loading profile information can be used to understand and predict possible impact-induced cell damage. It is found that the cell membrane usually undergoes a relatively severe deformation and the cell mechanical loading profile is dependent on the cell droplet initial velocity and the substrate coating thickness. Two important impact processes may occur during cell direct writing: the first impact between the cell droplet and the substrate coating and the second impact between the cell and the substrate. It is concluded that the impact-induced cell damage depends not only on the magnitudes of stress, acceleration, and∕or shear strain but also the loading history that a cell experiences.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 8

Particle vertical acceleration information (coating thickness=30μm and V0=50m∕s)

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Figure 1

Schematic of laser-assisted direct writing

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Figure 6

Particle maximum shear strain component information (coating thickness=30μm and V0=50m∕s)

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Figure 7

Particle vertical velocity information (coating thickness=30μm and V0=50m∕s)

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Figure 9

von Mises stress, vertical acceleration, and maximum shear strain component information of the bottom particle 19,150 at different velocities (coating thickness=30μm)

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Figure 10

von Mises stress, vertical acceleration, and maximum shear strain component information of the bottom particle 19,150 at different thicknesses (initial velocity=50m∕s)

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Figure 2

Illustration of SPH computational modeling domain

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Figure 3

Distribution of the selected particles in the cell and its 3D visualization

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Figure 4

Landing process at (a) 5.9322ns, (b) 0.1359μs, (c) 0.2725μs, and (d) 2.4865μs

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Figure 5

Particle von Mises stress information (coating thickness=30μm and V0=50m∕s)

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