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Research Papers

Low Plasticity Burnishing: An Innovative Manufacturing Method for Biomedical Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
C. Y. Seemikeri1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dr. B. A. Technical University, Lonere (MS) 402103, Indiartg–chandra@yahoo.com

P. K. Brahmankar

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dr. B. A. Technical University, Lonere (MS) 402103, Indiapkbrahma@yahoo.com

S. B. Mahagaonkar

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dr. B. A. Technical University, Lonere (MS) 402103, Indiasbmaha–rtg@yahoo.co.in

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 130(2), 021008 (Mar 24, 2008) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2896121 History: Received April 09, 2007; Revised January 08, 2008; Published March 24, 2008

Biomedical manufacturing technologies are assuming highly visible position at the frontiers of manufacturing. A new field, “engineered surfaces,” is emerging as a more effective and economic route to successful manufacture. Low plasticity burnishing (LPB) is relatively a new method of surface enhancement, which raises the burnishing to the next level of sophistication. LPB can provide deep and stable surface compression for improved surface integrity characteristics. This technology could be applied to diversified biomedical applications, since it has the potential to improve many surface characteristics, such as low- and high-cycle fatigue strengths, surface finish, surface hardness, corrosion resistance, wear resistance, etc. The present study focuses on the surface roughness, microhardness, surface integrity, and fatigue life aspects of AISI 316L work material, which is most commonly used in prosthesis, using full factorial design of experiments. Favorable and optimum conditions could be predicted and tailored for different biomedical requirements and applications. The assessment of the surface integrity aspects on work material was done, in terms of identifying the predominant factors, their order of significance, evaluating the interaction effects of parameters, and setting the levels of the factors for minimizing surface roughness and∕or maximizing surface hardness and fatigue life. Regression models were developed for surface characteristics of importance as response variables. Subsurface microhardness studies were also done to assess the depth of compression, altered material zone, and correlate fatigue life with surface roughness and surface hardness. The process can be applied to critical components used in biomedical field, such as total hip prosthesis, invasive surgeries, or medical implants effectively, as the LPB process today has significant process cycle time advantages, lower capital cost, and adaptability to conventional machine shop environment.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Parameters and their interactions effects on surface roughness

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Interaction of pressure with number of passes on surface roughness

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Interaction of pressure with speed on surface roughness

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Parameters and their interactions effects on surface hardness

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Interaction of pressure and ball diameter on surface hardness

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Interaction of speed and No. of passes on surface hardness

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Relation between roughness and fatigue life

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Parameters and their interaction effects on the fatigue life

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Interaction effect of speed and pressure on the fatigue life

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Interaction effect of pressure and number of passes on the fatigue life

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Variations of microhardness beneath the surface

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Contour plot of fatigue life

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Figure 2

Standard test specimen

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Figure 1

LPB process apparatus (schematic)

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