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Research Papers

Electrostatic Spray Deposition of Nanostructured Hydroxyapatite Coating for Biomedical Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Wenping Jiang

 NanoMech, LLC, Fayetteville, AR 72701

Li Sun, Gilbert Nyandoto

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701

Ajay P. Malshe

NanoMech, LLC, Fayetteville, AR 72701; Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701apm2@engr.uark.edu

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 130(2), 021001 (Mar 07, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2816016 History: Received April 15, 2007; Revised October 08, 2007; Published March 07, 2008

Hydroxyapatite, a calcium phosphate ceramic, is chemically similar to bone mineral and one of the few materials able to produce direct-bonding osteogenesis. Nanostructured hydroxyapatite coating has proved effective in promoting cell growth. However, synthesis of the coating on components of complex geometries with controlled phases is still a challenge. In this paper, we present the results from the exploration of electrostatic spray coating of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and the interaction of particles with laser. The nanoparticles were deposited on commercial grade titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) as a coating perform and bonded using a transient laser heating process. The coating was characterized for its surface morphology, particle size, and adhesion, and analyzed for its chemical compositions and phases. Results have shown the potential of this process to address some of the issues present in the current synthesis processes.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

TEM image of the HAp nanocrystals and selected area diffraction pattern

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Figure 2

Variation of electrostatic forces with powder coating thickness for HAp (a) discrete particles with APS of 50nm, and (b) clusters with size of 15μm

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Figure 3

Graph showing the variation of HAp coating preform thickness with electrical voltage (d=150mm; PA=140kPa; PF=140kPa; feeder powder mass=200mg)

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Figure 4

SEM images showing the correlation between surface morphology (cluster) with electrical voltage (d=150mm; PA=140kPa; PF=140kPa; feeder powder mass=150mg)

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Figure 5

A comparison of surface morphology of HAp coating preform deposited at atomizing pressures of 140kPa and 210kPa, respectively (V=−90kV; d=150mm; PF=140kPa; feeder powder mass=150mg)

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Figure 6

SEM images of a typical surface (a) and cross section (b) of HAp coating preform (V=−90kV; d=150mm; PA=210kPa; PF=140kPa; feeder powder mass=175mg)

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Figure 7

Graph showing the HAp deposition consistency by using electrostatic spray deposition (V=−90kV; d=150mm; PA=210kPa; PF=140kPa; feeder powder mass=175mg)

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Figure 8

Laser process parameter window (shaded region) for sintering deposited HAp nanoparticle (∼100nm in size)

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Figure 9

SEM image of the sintered HAp on Ti6Al4V (a) and EDS results (b)

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Figure 10

XRD patterns of (a) as-received HAp powder, and (b) HAp coating on Ti6Al4V substrate

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