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Research Papers

Substructure Coupling of Microend Mills to Aid in the Suppression of Chatter

[+] Author and Article Information
Brock A. Mascardelli, Theodor Freiheit

Micro Engineering Dynamics Automation Laboratory (MEDAL), Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive North West, Calgary, AB, T2 N 1N4, Canada

Simon S. Park

Micro Engineering Dynamics Automation Laboratory (MEDAL), Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive North West, Calgary, AB, T2 N 1N4, Canadasimon.park@ucalgary.ca

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 130(1), 011010 (Feb 06, 2008) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2816104 History: Received May 30, 2007; Revised October 02, 2007; Published February 06, 2008

Microend milling offers the ability to machine microparts of complex geometry relatively quickly when compared with photolithographic techniques. The key to good surface quality is the minimization of tool chatter. This requires an understanding of the milling tool and the milling structure system dynamics. However, impact hammer testing cannot be applied directly to the prediction of tool tip dynamics because microend mills are fragile, with tip diameters as small as 10μm. This paper investigates the application of the receptance coupling technique to mathematically couple the spindle/micromachine and arbitrary microtools with different geometries. The frequency response functions (FRFs) of the spindle/micromachine tool are measured experimentally through impact hammer testing, utilizing laser displacement and capacitance sensors. The dynamics of an arbitrary tool substructure are determined through modal finite element analyses. Joint rotational dynamics are indirectly determined through experimentally measuring the FRFs of gauge tools. From the FRFs, chatter conditions are predicted and verified through micromilling experiments.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

RC substructures

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Figure 2

Micromachining center

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Figure 3

Blank gauge tools

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Figure 4

Cantilever beam FRF versus actual FRF

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Figure 5

Blank cylinder substructure assembly

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Figure 6

Extracted RDOF dynamics. (a) h33,mm RDOF. (b) h33,fm RDOF.

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Figure 7

Comparison of G11 FRF results for cylinder III

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Figure 9

G11 RC results for a 500μm tool

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Figure 10

RC frequency results in comparison to modal analysis

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Figure 11

FEM and results for a 500μm tool with cantilever constraints. (a) FE tool model mesh. (b) FRF using FE harmonic analysis.

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Figure 12

Combined FRF using the RC (up to 10kHz) and high-frequency FE results (10–150kHz)

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Figure 13

Chatter-stability lobes. (a) Low-frequency chatter analysis results (FRF range up to 10kHz based on Fig. 9). (b) High-frequency chatter analysis results (FRF range up to 150kHz based on Fig. 1).

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Figure 14

Cantilever approximation chatter-stability analysis results

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Figure 15

Milling test validation of chatter analysis

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Figure 16

AE micromilling results in time and frequency domains. (a) 29,000rpm, 45μm axial depth of cut (chatter). (b) 32,000rpm, 45μm axial depth of cut (stable).

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Figure 17

Comparison of vibration response of 500μm tool with RC predicted FRF

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Figure 8

Microtool and RC system. (a) SEM image of a 500μm end mill. (b) Structure assembly.

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