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Research Papers

On Eccentric Tube Nosing

[+] Author and Article Information
Mahmoud Nemat-Alla

Associate Professor Mechanical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Assiut University, Assiut 71516, Egyptnematala@acc.aun.edu.eg

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 130(1), 011006 (Jan 30, 2008) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2783273 History: Received November 20, 2006; Revised August 04, 2007; Published January 30, 2008

Joining two tubes of different diameters has important concerns in many industries and engineering applications. An eccentric reducer is often used in such applications. Therefore, a simple and easy technique for manufacturing an eccentric reducer is of much importance. The simplest technique for producing the eccentric reducers is the tube nosing through eccentric conical dies. In this paper the finite element simulation is used to investigate the eccentric nosing of circular tubes through an eccentric conical die. Simulation is performed to investigate the plastic deformations of the deformed tube and all the possible modes of failure during the eccentric nosing process. Identification of unfavorable modes of failure in the tube nosing process lead to design modification guidelines, design of preform, and the die shape, for the eccentric nosing process. The results obtained confirmed that the modified design of the tube blank not only improves the quality of the nosed-tube product but also reduces nosing load and improves the limiting nosing ratio. Comparison with the experimental results shows that the nosing load and the modes of failure are successfully predicted by the finite element simulation. Also, a preform design for the tube blank that can produce an eccentric reducer with collar end that did not need a trimming process is introduced.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 8

Characterization of the load displacement curve of eccentric nosing with collar end processes

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Figure 9

Initial finite element mesh of the eccentric nosing process

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Figure 1

Classification of tube nosing processes: (a) concentric nosing; and (b) eccentric nosing

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Figure 2

Trimming of eccentric reducer for tube connection

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Figure 3

Eccentric nosing process using the proposed preform design

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Figure 4

Eccentric junction that shows the normal planes A and B and the intersection plane C

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Figure 5

Geometric parameters of the eccentric reducer junction and preform

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Figure 6

Variations of the inclination angle β, of the plane of the intersection between the eccentric reducer and the smallest diameter tube, with the half cone angle α

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Figure 7

Schematic diagram of the die set of the eccentric nosing with simultaneous collar end forming

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Figure 15

Variation of the tube penetration with the coefficient of friction for D0=47mm, t=2.0mm, L=100mm, α=10deg, d=25mm, and zero scarf angle

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Figure 16

Variation of thickness through the wall of the eccentric reducer for D0=47mm, t=2.0mm, L=100mm, α=10deg, d=25mm, μ=0.05, and zero scarf angle

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Figure 17

Variations of thickness through the surface of the eccentric reducer for D0=47mm, t=2.0mm, L=100mm, α=10deg, d=25mm, and zero scarf angle

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Figure 18

Comparison of the FE predicted and experimentally obtained deformed shapes for modes of failure; (a) plugging due to buckling; (b) circumferential wrinkling; (c) early axial wrinkling; and (d) late axial wrinkling.

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Figure 19

Variation of the tube penetration value, which can produce an eccentric reducer with collar end that did not need the trimming process, versus the blank scarf angle

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Figure 10

Geometrical parameters of the eccentric die and tube blank

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Figure 11

True stress-strain curve for mild steel obtained from compression test

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Figure 12

Comparison of finite element load displacement curve with the experimental result for; D0=47mm, t=1.5mm, L=100mm, μ=0.05, α=10deg, d=25mm, and zero scarf angle

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Figure 13

Collar ended eccentric reducer: (a) obtained by finite element simulation; and (b) experimentally obtained

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Figure 14

Variation of the load displacement curve for eccentric nosing process with the coefficient of friction for D0=47mm, t=2.0mm, L=100mm, α=10deg, d=25mm, and zero scarf angle

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