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Research Papers

Effect of Laser Preheating the Workpiece on Micro end Milling of Metals

[+] Author and Article Information
Yongho Jeon

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI 53706

Frank Pfefferkorn1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI 53706pfefferk@engr.wisc.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 130(1), 011004 (Jan 30, 2008) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2783219 History: Received April 18, 2006; Revised August 05, 2007; Published January 30, 2008

Micro end milling is a fast and direct method of creating net-shaped functional microparts, micromolds, and prototypes. However, the small flexural stiffness, strength, and hardness of the tool limit the efficiency of machining. It is not expected that a new material with increased hardness and yield strength will be developed in the near future that significantly improves the durability for tools manufactured with diameters in the tens to hundreds of microns. To enable a significant increase in performance and productivity requires higher spindle speeds and increased chiploads. However, an increase in chipload is inhibited by the small flexural stiffness and strength of the tools: a direct result of the tool diameter. Laser-assisted micro end milling has the potential to increase the chipload and productivity by locally reducing the workpiece material’s yield strength at the cutting location. This study examines the effect of laser preheating on micro end milling of 6061-T6 aluminum and 1018 steel. Two-flute, 300μmdia, carbide end mills are used to cut 100μm deep slots at a spindle speed of 40,000rpm. The laser power and chipload are varied to show their effect on cutting forces, specific cutting energy, burr formation, surface finish, and temperature. The results are compared to the average material removal temperature given by predictions made from a heat transfer model of the workpiece undergoing laser preheating. Results indicate that chipload and productivity can be significantly increased during dry machining of 6061-T6 aluminum and 1018 steel by localized preheating of the workpiece.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 5

Chipload as a function of material removal temperature for Al 6061-T6

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Figure 6

Chipload as a function of material removal temperature for 1018 steel

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Figure 7

Main cutting force at selected laser powers for Al 6061-T6

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Figure 1

(a) Schematic of laser-assisted micro end milling and (b) Boundary conditions and dimensions

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Figure 2

Yield strength as a function of temperature for Al alloys

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Figure 3

Comparison of predicted and measured temperature for Al 6061-T6 workpiece

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Figure 4

Comparison of predicted and measured temperature for Al 6061-T6 workpiece

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Figure 8

Thrust force at selected laser powers for Al 6061-T6

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Figure 9

Main cutting force at selected laser powers for 1018 steel

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Figure 10

Thrust force at selected laser powers for 1018 steel

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Figure 11

Averaged cutting forces as a function of laser power for Al 6061-T6

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Figure 12

Averaged cutting forces as a function of laser power for 1018 steel

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Figure 13

Specific cutting energy as a function of material removal temperature in Al 6061-T6

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Figure 14

Specific cutting energy as a function of material removal temperature in 1018 steel

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Figure 15

Micrograph of channels showing surface texture and burrs

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Figure 16

Surface roughness change with different material removal temperature for Al 6061-T6

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Figure 17

Surface roughness change with different material removal temperature for 1018 steel

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