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Research Papers

A New Algorithm for the Numerical Simulation of Machined Surface Topography in Multiaxis Ball-End Milling

[+] Author and Article Information
Wei-Hong Zhang1

Sino-French Laboratory of Concurrent Engineering, The Key Laboratory of Contemporary Design and Integrated Manufacturing Technology, School of Mechatronic Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, P.O. Box 552 Shaanxi, Xi’an 710072, Chinazhangwh@nwpu.edu.cn

Gang Tan, Min Wan, Tong Gao

Sino-French Laboratory of Concurrent Engineering, The Key Laboratory of Contemporary Design and Integrated Manufacturing Technology, School of Mechatronic Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, P.O. Box 552 Shaanxi, Xi’an 710072, China

David Hicham Bassir

FEMTO-ST, Départment LMARC, UMR—CNRS 6174, 25000 Besancon, France

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 130(1), 011003 (Jan 30, 2008) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2815337 History: Received May 16, 2006; Revised August 29, 2007; Published January 30, 2008

In milling process, surface topography is a significant factor that affects directly the surface integrity and constitutes a supplement to the form error associated with the workpiece deformation. Based on the tool machining paths and the trajectory equation of the cutting edge relative to the workpiece, a new and general iterative algorithm is developed here for the numerical simulation of the machined surface topography in multiaxis ball-end milling. The influences of machining parameters such as the milling modes, cutter runout, cutter inclination direction, and inclination angle upon the topography and surface roughness values are studied in detail. Compared with existing methods, the basic advantages and novelties of the proposed method can be resumed below. First, it is unnecessary to discretize the cutting edge and tool feed motion and rotation motion. Second, influences of cutting modes and cutter inclinations are studied systematically and explicitly for the first time. The generality of the algorithm makes it possible to calculate the pointwise topography value on any sculptured surface of the workpiece. Besides, the proposed method is proved to be more efficient in saving computing time than the time step method that is commonly used. Finally, some examples are presented and simulation results are compared with experimental ones.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Coordinate systems in the ball-end milling process

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Figure 2

Coordinate system transformation in multiaxis ball-end milling

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Figure 3

Isovalue curves of equation system without cutter runout (e=0)

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Figure 4

Typical plane cutting modes: (1) unidirectional upmilling with inclined angle γ, (2) unidirectional downmilling with inclined angle γ, (3) bidirectional milling with inclined angle γ, (4) unidirectional upmilling with inclined angle η, (5) unidirectional downmilling with inclined angle η, and (6) bidirectional milling with inclined angle η

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Figure 5

Overlapping of two sweeping points of the cutting edges: (1) unidirectional downmilling mode, (2) unidirectional upmilling mode, and (3) bidirectional milling mode

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Figure 6

Simulated topography results under different feedrates of F (mm/min): (1) unidirectional upmilling mode and (2) bidirectional milling mode

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Figure 7

Simulation topography of unidirectional upmilling (F=2000mm∕min)

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Figure 8

Measured machined surface topography (8)(F=2000mm∕min): (1) surface topography in unidirectional cutting mode and (2) surface topography in bidirectional cutting mode

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Figure 9

Comparison of roughness curves versus feed per tooth ft (mm/tooth): (1) results given in Ref. 8 and (2) our results Rz

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Figure 10

Machined surface topography with inclined angle γ=10deg and η=0deg: (1) unidirectional upmilling and (2) bidirectional milling

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Figure 11

Roughness curves versus inclined angles γ,η: (1) unidirectional milling mode and (2) bidirectional milling mode

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Figure 13

Unidirectional cutting mode: (1) convex contouring, (2) convex ramping, (3) concave contouring, and (4) concave ramping

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Figure 14

Tool path discretization: (1) convex contouring, (2) convex ramping, (3) concave contouring, and (4) concave ramping

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Figure 15

Simulated topographies (μm) of the cylindrical surface: (1) convex contouring with Φ=[5deg,30deg] and (2) concave contouring with Φ=[5deg,30deg]

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Figure 16

Illustration of remainder height in convex and concave ball-end milling

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Figure 17

Simulated and measured topographies (μm) versus cutter position angle Φ in convex contouring milling: (1) simulated Φ=[−5deg,5deg]; (2) measured Φ=[−5deg,5deg]; (3) simulated Φ=[5deg,15deg]; (4) measured Φ=[5deg,15deg]; (5) simulated ramping Φ=[5deg,15deg]; and (6) measured ramping Φ=[5deg,15deg]

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Figure 12

Simulations and experiments of surface topographies: (1) simulated unidirectional upmilling (γ=15deg, η=10deg); (2) simulated bidirectional milling (γ=15deg, η=10deg); (3) simulated unidirectional upmilling (γ=15deg, η=0deg); (4) simulated bidirectional milling (γ=15deg, η=0deg); (5) measured unidirectional upmilling (γ=15deg, η=10deg); (6) measured bidirectional milling (γ=15deg, η=10deg); (7) measured unidirectional upmilling (γ=15deg, η=0deg); and (8) measured bidirectional milling (γ=15deg, η=0deg)

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