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Research Papers

Analytical and Thermal Modeling of High-Speed Machining With Chamfered Tools

[+] Author and Article Information
Yiğit Karpat

Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-80185ykarpat@eden.rutgers.edu

Tuğrul Özel1

Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-80185ozel@rci.rutgers.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 130(1), 011001 (Dec 07, 2007) (15 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2783282 History: Received February 27, 2007; Revised August 02, 2007; Published December 07, 2007

High-speed machining offers several advantages such as increased flexibility and productivity for discrete-part manufacturing. However, excessive heat generation and resulting high temperatures on the tool and workpiece surfaces in high-speed machining leads to a shorter tool life and poor part quality, especially if the tool edge geometry and cutting conditions were not selected properly. In this study, analytical and thermal modeling of high-speed machining with chamfered tools in the presence of dead metal zone has been presented to investigate the effects of cutting conditions, heat generation, and resultant temperature distributions at the tool and in the workpiece. An analytical slip-line field model is utilized to investigate the process mechanics and friction at the tool-chip and tool-workpiece interfaces in the presence of the dead metal zone in machining with a negative rake chamfered polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool. In order to identify friction conditions, a set of orthogonal cutting tests is performed on AISI 4340 steel and chip geometries and cutting forces are measured. Thermal modeling of machining with chamfered tools based on moving band heat source theory, which utilizes the identified friction conditions and stress distributions on the tool-chip and tool-workpiece interfaces, is also formulated and temperature distributions at the tool, cutting zone, and in the workpiece are obtained. These temperature distributions are compared with the results obtained from finite element simulations. The comparison of temperature fields indicates that the proposed model provides reasonable solutions to understand the mechanics of machining with chamfered tools. Models presented here can be further utilized to optimize the tool geometry and cutting conditions for increasing benefits that high-speed machining offers.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Dead metal zone when machining austenitic stainless steel with a chamfered tool with 60deg rake angle at cutting

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Figure 2

The slip-line model (a); free-body diagram (b); and its hodograph (c)

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Figure 3

(a) Normal and shear stress distribution on the chamfer tool; and (b) force equilibrium at the chamfer face

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Figure 4

Experimental setup for orthogonal turning

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Figure 5

SEM image of the chamfered insert at 50 times magnification

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Figure 6

Measured: (a) forces; (b) force ratio; and (c) cut chip thickness

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Figure 7

SEM images of the chips collected during experiments

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Figure 8

Identified dead metal zone angle (α) and slip line field angle (θ) for V=125m∕min: (a) tu=0.1mm; (b) tu=0.15mm, and (c) tu=0.18mm

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Figure 9

Variation of rake face friction factor with uncut chip thickness and cutting speed

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Figure 10

Distribution of normal stresses for V=125m∕min on the rake face of the tool

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Figure 11

Percentage of resultant force exerted on the chamfer face

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Figure 12

Heat sources in thermal modeling of orthogonal cutting with a chamfered tool

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Figure 13

Shear plane heat source

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Figure 14

Thermal modeling of primary heat source on the workpiece side

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Figure 15

Thermal modeling of DMZ heat source on the workpiece side

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Figure 16

(a) Frictional heat source along tool chip interface; and (b) nonuniform heat intensity

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Figure 17

Thermal modeling on the tool side: (a) rake face; and (b) chamfer face

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Figure 18

Temperature distribution at the: (a) rake and (b) chamfer interfaces for tu=0.1mm

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Figure 19

Temperature distribution along the: (a) rake and (b) chamfer interfaces for V=125m∕min and various uncut chip thickness values

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Figure 20

Temperature distribution along the; (a) rake and (b) chamfer interfaces for V=175m∕min and various uncut chip thickness values

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Figure 21

Heat partition along rake face for tu=0.15mm

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Figure 25

Temperature distributions in the workpiece: (a) V=175m∕min, tu=0.1mm and (b) V=125m∕min, tu=0.1mm (all temperatures are in °C)

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Figure 26

Temperature distributions in the workpiece: (a) V=175m∕min, tu=0.18mm and (b) V=175m∕min, tu=0.15mm (all temperatures are in °C)

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Figure 27

Temperature distributions in the workpiece: (a) V=125m∕min, tu=0.18mm and (b) V=125m∕min, tu=0.15mm (all temperatures are in °C)

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Figure 28

Maximum temperatures under the dead metal zone TAD

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Figure 24

Isotherms obtained from analytical method for: (a) V=125m∕min, tu=0.1mm; and (b) V=175m∕min, tu=0.1mm (all temperatures are in °C)

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Figure 23

Velocity field for the cutting conditions of V=125m∕min, tu=0.1mm and V=175m∕min, tu=0.15mm

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Figure 22

Simulated chip formation for the cutting conditions of V=125m∕min, tu=0.1mm and V=175m∕min, tu=0.15mm

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