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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Drilling Characteristics of an E-Glass Fabric-Reinforced Polypropylene Composite and an Aluminum Alloy: A Comparative Study

[+] Author and Article Information
C. Dandekar, E. Orady

Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing, University of Michigan-Dearborn, 4901 Evergreen Road, Dearborn, MI 48128

P. K. Mallick

Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing, University of Michigan-Dearborn, 4901 Evergreen Road, Dearborn, MI 48128pkm@umich.edu

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 129(6), 1080-1087 (Apr 04, 2007) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2752827 History: Received March 14, 2006; Revised April 04, 2007

This paper presents an experimental study on the drilling characteristics of an E-glass fabric-reinforced polypropylene composite and aluminum alloy 6061-T6. Both materials have many similar structural applications, especially in the automotive industry. The drilling characteristics considered were axial thrust force, torque, temperature increase during drilling, and chip morphology. Both axial thrust force and torque were significantly higher for the aluminum alloy but were independent of the cutting speed for both materials. However, both increased linearly with increasing feed rate for the composite, but nonlinearly for the aluminum alloy. The Shaw-Oxford equation for predicting axial thrust and torque worked well with the aluminum alloy but did not fit the composite’s axial thrust and torque characteristics. Both materials exhibited temperature rise at locations close to the drilled hole. The temperature rise decreased with increasing feed rate as well as increasing cutting speed; however, the maximum temperature rise in the composite was significantly lower than that in the aluminum alloy. There was also a significant difference in the morphology of chips of these two materials.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Setup for drilling experiments

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Figure 2

Thermocouple locations (small circles) for temperature measurement during drilling: (a) stacked composite specimens and (b) aluminum specimens (in millimeter)

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Figure 3

Axial thrust force and torque versus drill penetration for stacked composite specimens at feed rate=0.1mm∕rev and cutting speed=2m∕min

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Figure 4

Axial thrust force versus drill penetration for compression molded composite specimens at feed rate=0.1mm∕rev and cutting speed=2m∕min

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Figure 5

Axial thrust force and torque versus drill penetration for aluminum specimens at feed rate=0.1mm∕rev and cutting speed=2m∕min

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Figure 6

Axial thrust force versus feed rate: (a) composite specimens and (b) aluminum specimens

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Figure 7

Torque versus feed rate: (a) composite specimens and (b) aluminum specimens

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Figure 8

Model validation: (a) Equation 1 for composite specimens and (b) Shaw-Oxford equation for aluminum specimens

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Figure 9

Temperature versus drill penetration: (a) stacked composite specimens and (b) aluminum specimens

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Figure 10

Temperature rise versus feed rate for stacked composite and aluminum specimens at 10.7mm distance from the top surface

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Figure 11

Chip morphology at different feed rates and 2m∕min cutting speed

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Figure 12

Chip morphology at different feed rates at 24m∕min cutting speed

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Figure 13

Chip morphology at different feed rates at 50m∕min cutting speed

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Figure 14

Chip length versus feed rate at different cutting speeds for stacked composite and aluminum specimens

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