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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Mechanics and Dynamics of the Circular Milling Process

[+] Author and Article Information
N. Kardes

Manufacturing Automation Laboratory, University of British Columbia, 2324 Main Mall, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z4, Canada

Y. Altintas

Manufacturing Automation Laboratory, University of British Columbia, 2324 Main Mall, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z4, Canadaaltintas@mech.ubc.ca

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 129(1), 21-31 (Jan 09, 2006) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2345391 History: Received April 25, 2005; Revised January 09, 2006

Circular milling operations are used to enlarge die and mold cavities, cylinder bores and machine airframe pockets. The tool attached to the rotating spindle follows a circular trajectory with a machining feed rate, while gradually moving forward in the direction of global x axis with a step over feed. This paper presents the mathematical model of chip removal mechanism by predicting time varying cutter-part intersection as the cutter travels along the circular path. The vibration free cutting forces are predicted and experimentally verified. The dynamics of the process are modeled by considering vibrations of the end mill in two directions. The chatter stability of circular milling is modeled both in frequency domain and with a numerical model based on time finite element analysis which considers time varying immersion and directional factors. The resulting stability solutions are compared against experimental results.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Top view of circular milling

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Figure 2

Tool positions during operation

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Figure 3

Cutting forces in tangential and radial direction

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Figure 4

Simulated cutting forces in x and y direction

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Figure 5

Measured cutting forces in x and y directions

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Figure 6

Comparison of measured and simulated cutting forces at a small time window

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Figure 7

Variation of exit angle during the rotation of the tool around the workpiece

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Figure 8

Variation of chip thickness during the rotation of the tool around the workpiece

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Figure 9

Time finite element method developed for interrupted cutting operations

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Figure 10

Comparison of experimental and theoretical results

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Figure 11

Simulation results for a stable circular milling, see test 1 in Table 1 (n=1500 [rpm] and b=6 [mm], see Table 2)

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Figure 12

Simulation results for an unstable circular milling, see test 14 in Table 1 (n=7205 [rpm] and b=11 [mm], see Table 2)

Tables

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