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TECHNICAL PAPERS

The Performance of Small Diameter Twist Drills in Deep-Hole Drilling

[+] Author and Article Information
Robert Heinemann1

School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD, UKrobert.heinemann@Manchester.ac.uk

Srichand Hinduja, George Barrow

School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD, UK

Gerhard Petuelli

Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, South Westphalia University of Applied Sciences, Campus Soest, Luebecker Ring 2, 59494 Soest, Germany

1

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 128(4), 884-892 (Apr 12, 2006) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2335859 History: Received March 31, 2005; Revised April 12, 2006

This paper investigates the performance of small diameter high-speed steel twist drills drilling boreholes with a depth of ten times the diameter into carbon steel AISI 1045 using minimum quantity lubrication. The performance of small twist drills is determined, first, by their deep-hole drilling capability, i.e., in how far the cutting forces can be kept at a noncritical level by maintaining the chip disposal, and, second, by their tool life. This work shows that both the deep-hole drilling capability and tool life of small drills are strongly dependent on their geometry, in particular the size of the chip flutes, and the flute surface topography.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Experimental setup consisting of a two-component dynamometer with a workpiece holder and a second vice

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Figure 2

Position-dependent accuracy of the dynamometer when measuring thrust force and torque

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Figure 3

Cross sections at different positions along the flutes of different twist drills

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Figure 4

Scans of chip flute surfaces

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Figure 5

Variation of the thrust force and torque with borehole depth using drill type A with common cutting parameters

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Figure 6

Variation of the torque with borehole depth using drills of types B to F and common cutting parameters

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Figure 7

Variation in the torque during consecutive drilling cycles using a feed-hold drilling strategy

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Figure 8

Variation of the maximum torque with cutting speed and feed rate for drill type D

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Figure 9

Tool life achieved with single-stroke drilling with common cutting parameters

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Figure 10

Wear patterns of drill types B and D at two stages of their tool life with common cutting parameters

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Figure 11

Wear patterns of drill types E and F at two stages of their tool life with common cutting parameters

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Figure 12

Tool life achieved with single-stroke drilling with the recommended cutting parameters

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Figure 13

Tool life achieved with peck-drilling with common cutting parameters

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Figure 14

Wear patterns obtained with different drilling strategies at 90% of tool life of drill type B with common cutting parameters

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Figure 15

Tool life achieved with peck-drilling using two and four retractions with common cutting parameters

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