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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Edge Trimming of Aluminum Sheets Using Shear Slitting at a Rake Angle

[+] Author and Article Information
Hongbing Lu1

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078hongbin@ceat.okstate.edu

Jin Ma

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078

Ming Li

 Manufacturing Technology Division, Alcoa Technical Center, Alcoa, PA 15069

1

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 128(4), 866-873 (May 30, 2006) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2336258 History: Received August 30, 2005; Revised May 30, 2006

Edge burr is inevitably present at a slit edge when an aluminum web is shear slit by a pair of rotary knives (or blades) engaged and rotated in opposite directions. This paper presents a new method of shear slitting for an aluminum sheet to produce very low edge burr height, for use in edge trimming. The method uses the same bottom rotary blade as in the traditional shear slitting, but a revised top blade that forms a rake angle with respect to the bottom blade. The top blade edge is chamfered so that the surface of the top blade edge is parallel to the surface of the bottom blade edge to produce a pair of shearing surfaces to shear slit the aluminum sheet. A sequential set of micrographs of an aluminum slit edge are taken to visualize different stages of the shear slitting process. The observation indicates that this new slitting configuration induces a local tension as a result of blade relative motion so that a combined tension∕shear is applied to the aluminum sheet to facilitate early separation in the aluminum sheets. As a result, a clean edge with very small burr height is produced consistently. Edge trimming of aluminum sheet over a wide range of slitting conditions indicates that the new configuration is insensitive to blade gap and overlap, and can lead to a clean cut with very low edge burr height even when two blades are separated by a gap that is a few times of the sheet thickness.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A scanning electron micrograph of a burr at a slit edge

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Figure 2

Illustration of the parameters in shear slitting. (a) A front view of the top and bottom blades at zero-rake angle used in traditional shear slitting; (b) a side view of the top and bottom blades; (c) a top view of the blades; (d) a front view of the top blade tilted at a rake angle with respect to the bottom blade.

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Figure 3

Shear slitters with the top blade tilted at a negative rake angle

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Figure 4

Schematic of the setup of the traditional shear slitting

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Figure 5

Slitting setup using the traditional disk knife at a rake angle. Very poor, highly bended slit edges were produced.

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Figure 6

Revised top blade at a negative rake angle with the bottom blade

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Figure 7

Sequential micrographs of slit edges in shear slitting using revised blade geometry at zero clearance and a rake angle of −18deg

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Figure 8

Burr heights versus rake angle at zero clearance

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Figure 9

Burr height related to clearance (gap)

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Figure 10

Micrographs of the rear slit edges at different clearances

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Figure 11

Comparison of rear top burr height at different clearances and rake angles

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Figure 12

Rear top burr height versus overlap at different rake angles

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Figure 13

Rear top burr height versus cant angle at different rake angles

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