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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Tube Bending Under Axial Force and Internal Pressure

[+] Author and Article Information
Jyhwen Wang1

Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843jwang@tamu.edu

Rohit Agarwal

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843

1

To whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 128(2), 598-605 (Jun 15, 2005) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2112987 History: Received February 05, 2004; Revised June 15, 2005

Tube bending is a widely used manufacturing process in the aerospace, automotive, and various other industries. During tube bending, considerable in-plane distortion and thickness variation occurs. Additional loadings such as axial force and internal pressure can be used to achieve better shape control. Based on plasticity theories, analytical models are developed to predict cross-sectional distortion and thickness change of tubes under various loading conditions. The model predictions are in good agreement with finite element simulations and published experimental results. The models can be used to evaluate tooling and process design in tube bending.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Rotary draw bending (from FEA model)

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Figure 2

Coordinate system used for the model

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Figure 3

Stress acting on a small element of the tube Tang (8)

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Figure 4

Comparison of the thickness predicted by the analytical model with the experimental results and numerical model of Pan and Stelson (7)

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Figure 5

Comparison of the thickness predicted by the analytical model and the FEA with the experimental results of Khodayari (20)

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Figure 6

Comparison of cross-sectional distortion obtained from the FEA simulations, the experimental results (Khodayari (20)), and the present analytical model

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Figure 7

FEA simulation for a 90 deg bend showing wrinkling in the tube. The geometric and material properties used in simulation are listed in Table 3.

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Figure 8

(a) Application of axial pull eliminates wrinkling. (b) Comparison of the thickness prediction by the analytical model (axial pull 12.9 kN, no internal pressure) with the FEA simulation (axial pull 12.9 kN, no internal pressure), and the analytical model (no axial pull, no internal pressure).

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Figure 9

Comparison of the thickness prediction by the analytical model (an axial pull of 12.9 kN, no internal pressure) with the FEA simulation with and without a pressure die boost of 50 MPa

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Figure 10

Comparison of the radius predicted by the analytical model for an axial pull of 12.9 kN with the initial tube radius

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