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TECHNICAL PAPERS

A New Self-Piercing Riveting Process and Strength Evaluation

[+] Author and Article Information
Bin Wang, Chuanyong Hao, Jinsong Zhang

 Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, P. R. China

Hongyan Zhang

Department of MIME, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 128(2), 580-587 (Apr 27, 2005) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2137746 History: Received November 12, 2004; Revised April 27, 2005

Self-piercing riveting (SPR) has become an important alternative joining technique for the automotive applications of aluminum sheets. Most existing SPR machines use electrical motors to drive a rivet into the sheets. A significant amount of research has been conducted to improve an SPR joint’s strength by increasing the mechanical interlock. In this paper, a new process is presented using gunpowder to drive the riveting process. A joint formed using the new process has different geometric characteristics from one created using a conventional system. The tensile-shear, cross-tension, fatigue, and impact performances of self-piercing riveted joints using the new device are compared to those of spot-welded joints on aluminum sheets. The experiment has proven that the new SPR joints have provided a similar or higher strength than resistance spot welds.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

The new SPR system and its working mechanism

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Figure 2

Drawing of tensile-shear testing specimens (unit: millimeters)

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Figure 3

Drawing of cross-tension testing specimens (unit: millimeters)

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Figure 4

Drawing of fatigue testing specimens (unit: millimeters)

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Figure 5

Drawing of impact testing specimens (unit: millimeters)

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Figure 6

Drawing of the die used in riveting 2mm aluminum sheets in this study (unit: millimeters)

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Figure 7

An SPR riveted joint: (a) top view and (b) back view

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Figure 8

Cross sections of (a) an impact SPR joint and (b) a quasi-static SPR joint

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Figure 9

Cross sections of an impact SPR joint

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Figure 10

Cross sections of a quasi-static SPR joint

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Figure 11

Impact load during the impact SPR process

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Figure 12

Tensile-shear tested specimens: (a) impact SPR joints and (b) RSW joints

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Figure 13

Tested cross-tension specimens: (a) an SPR joint and (b) a RSW joint

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Figure 14

Tested fatigue specimens: (a) an impact SPR joint and (b) a RSW joint

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Figure 15

Results of fatigue testing of impact SPR and RSW joints

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Figure 16

Impact-tested specimens: (a) the top sheet and the rivet pulled off from the bottom sheet and (b) the torn-off rivet and a hole left on the top sheet

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Figure 17

Impact-tested RSW specimens

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Figure 18

Performance comparison between SPR and spot-welded joints

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Figure 19

Tensile-shear strength comparison between quasi-static and impact SPR, and spot-welded joints

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