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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Thermal Modeling for Laser-Assisted Machining of Silicon Nitride Ceramics with Complex Features

[+] Author and Article Information
Yinggang Tian, Yung C. Shin

School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 128(2), 425-434 (Oct 11, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2162906 History: Received November 18, 2004; Revised October 11, 2005

The feasibility of laser-assisted machining (LAM) and its potential to significantly reduce fabrication costs and improve product quality have been shown experimentally for various ceramic materials. However, no systematical investigation has been performed to expand LAMs capability to parts with complex features, although such capability is essential for industrial applications. This paper presents a transient, three-dimensional thermal model developed for LAM of workpieces with complex geometric features and its validation by in-process surface temperature measurements with an infrared camera. It is shown that the LAM experiments designed based on the predictions by the thermal model successfully produced silicon nitride parts with complex features, thus demonstrating the capabilities of LAM in fabricating ceramic parts suitable for industrial implementation.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Sketch of the laser-assisted machining of a cylindrical workpiece

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Figure 2

Illustration of the partial deactivating control volumes

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Figure 3

Experimental setup of LAM

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Figure 4

Silicon nitride parts with complex features produced by LAM

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Figure 5

Comparison of the infrared image and the model prediction for case Siṉ1 after 17.6s of LAM: (a) infrared image and (b) predicted temperature field

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Figure 6

Comparison of the infrared image with the prediction for case Siṉ1 after 56s of LAM: (a) infrared image and (b) predicted temperature field

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Figure 7

Comparisons of the measured and predicted temperatures at various laser powers: (a) nominal case at the laser power of 280W and (b) case Siṉ2 at 260W and Siṉ3 at 300W

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Figure 8

Comparisons of the measured and predicted temperatures at various speeds: (a) case Siṉ4 at the speed of 500rpm and (b) case Siṉ5 at the speed of 1500rpm

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Figure 9

Comparisons of the measured and predicted temperatures at various feeds: (a) case Siṉ6 at the feed of 0.01mm∕rev and (b) case Siṉ7 at the feed of 0.03mm∕rev

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Figure 10

Predicted material removal temperature histories for case Siṉ1

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Figure 11

Predicted r-z cross section temperature fields for case Siṉ1: (a) at t=30.8s, approximately corresponding to the minimum depth of cut (Figs.  47) and (b) At t=51.2s, approximately corresponding to the maximum depth of cut (Figs.  47)

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Figure 12

Uncertainty associated with a ±10% variation of the material absorptivity

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Figure 13

Uncertainty associated with the heat generation from machining for case Siṉ1

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