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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Dynamic Modeling of Powder Delivery Systems in Gravity-Fed Powder Feeders

[+] Author and Article Information
Heng Pan

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri—Rolla, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65409-0050hp5c7@umr.edu

Robert G. Landers

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri—Rolla, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65409-0050landersr@umr.edu

Frank Liou

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri—Rolla, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65409-0050liou@umr.edu

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 128(1), 337-345 (Jul 11, 2005) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2120778 History: Received December 16, 2004; Revised July 11, 2005

This paper presents an approach for modeling powder delivery system dynamics in low flow rate applications. Discrete particle modeling (DPM) is utilized to analyze the motion of individual powder particles. In DPM, an irregular bouncing model is employed to represent the powder dispersion in the powder delivery system induced by non-spherical particle-wall collisions. A three-dimensional friction collision model is utilized to simulate the interactions between particles and the powder delivery system walls. The modeling approach is experimentally verified and simulation studies are conducted to explore the effect of powder delivery system mechanical design parameters (i.e., tube length, diameter, and angle, number of tubes and meshes, and mesh orientation and size) on the powder flow dynamics. The simulation studies demonstrate that the powder delivery system dynamics can be modeled by a pure transport delay coupled with a first order system.

Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

(a) Microscopic image of H13 tool steel powder particles, (b) representation of satellited particles, and (c) particle size distribution function

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Figure 2

Illustration of two-dimensional non-spherical particle-wall collision model

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Figure 3

Illustration of three-dimensional non-spherical particle-wall collision model

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Figure 4

Illustration of θ and ξ for three-dimensional dynamic particle model

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Figure 5

Local coordinate for collision model

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Figure 6

Powder feeder system schematic

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Figure 7

(a) Powder delivery system schematic and (b) powder delivery system computer simulation representation

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Figure 8

Optical sensor voltage output versus powder mass flow rate

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Figure 9

Powder mass flow rate for different tube length

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Figure 10

Powder mass flow rate for different tube diameters

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Figure 11

Powder mass flow rate for different tube angles

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Figure 12

Powder mass flow rate for different numbers of tubes

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Figure 13

Powder mass flow rate for different mesh sizes (in mm)

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Figure 14

Powder mass flow rate for different mesh orientations

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Figure 15

Powder mass flow rate for different numbers of meshes

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