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TECHNICAL PAPERS

A Methodology to Determine Work Material Flow Stress and Tool-Chip Interfacial Friction Properties by Using Analysis of Machining

[+] Author and Article Information
Tuğrul Özel1

Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Rutgers University , Piscataway, NJ 08854ozel@rci.rutgers.edu

Erol Zeren

Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Rutgers University , Piscataway, NJ 08854

1

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 128(1), 119-129 (Jun 03, 2005) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2118767 History: Received November 30, 2004; Revised June 03, 2005

In this paper, we develop a methodology to determine flow stress at the machining regimes and friction characteristics at the tool-chip interface from the results of orthogonal cutting tests. We utilize metal cutting analysis originally developed by late Oxley and present some improvements. We also evaluate several temperature models in calculating the average temperatures at primary and secondary deformation zones and present comparisons with the experimental data obtained for AISI 1045 steel through assessment of machining models (AMM) activity. The proposed methodology utilizes measured forces and chip thickness obtained through a basic orthogonal cutting test. We conveniently determine work material flow stress at the primary deformation zone and the interfacial friction characteristics along the tool rake face. Calculated friction characteristics include parameters of the normal and frictional stress distributions on the rake face that are maximum normal stress σNmax, power exponent for the normal stress distribution, a, length of the plastic contact, lp, length of the tool-chip contact, lc, the average shear flow stress at tool-chip interface, kchip, and an average coefficient of friction, μe, in the sliding region of the tool-chip interface. Determined flow stress data from orthogonal cutting tests is combined with the flow stress measured through split-hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests and the Johnson-Cook work material model is obtained. Therefore, with this methodology, we extend the applicability of a Johnson-Cook work material model to machining regimes.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Simplified deformation zones in orthogonal cutting

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Figure 2

Forces acting on the shear plane and the tool with resultant stress distributions on the tool rake face

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Figure 3

Comparison of predicted cutting forces with experiments (29) for various temperature models in machining AISI 1045 steel

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Figure 4

Comparison of predicted thrust forces with experiments (29) for various temperature models in machining AISI 1045 steel

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Figure 5

Comparison of predicted average temperature at the primary zone for various temperature models in machining AISI 1045 steel

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Figure 6

Comparison of predicted average temperature at tool-chip interface with experiments (29) for various temperature models in machining AISI 1045 steel

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Figure 7

Flow chart for the methodology to determine work material flow stress

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Figure 8

Flow chart for the methodology to determine the parameters of tool-chip interfacial friction as normal and frictional stress distributions

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