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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Three-Component Receptance Coupling Substructure Analysis for Tool Point Dynamics Prediction

[+] Author and Article Information
Tony L. Schmitz1

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611tschmitz@ufl.edu

G. Scott Duncan

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611

1

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 127(4), 781-790 (Feb 04, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2039102 History: Received April 06, 2004; Revised February 04, 2005

In this paper we present the second generation receptance coupling substructure analysis (RCSA) method, which is used to predict the tool point response for high-speed machining applications. This method divides the spindle-holder-tool assembly into three substructures: the spindle-holder base; the extended holder; and the tool. The tool and extended holder receptances are modeled, while the spindle-holder base subassembly receptances are measured using a “standard” test holder and finite difference calculations. To predict the tool point dynamics, RCSA is used to couple the three substructures. Experimental validation is provided.

Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 3

Example standard holder for spindle-holder base subassembly receptance identification (dimensions provided in Table 1). Hammer impacts are completed at locations 3, 3b, and 3c to identify the required direct and cross receptances

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Figure 4

Standard holder substructures for inverse receptance coupling

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Figure 5

Spindle receptances G55(ω) determined from standard holder direct and cross receptance measurements

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Figure 6

Tapered thermal shrink fit holder (25.3 mm bore) substructure model

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Figure 7

Measured (two nominally identical holders) and predicted H33 results for tapered thermal shrink fit holder (25.3 mm bore)

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Figure 8

Tapered thermal shrink fit holder with 19.1-mm-diam tool blank substructure model

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Figure 9

Measured and predicted H11 results for tapered thermal shrink fit holder with 19.1-mm-diam tool blank (111.9 mm overhang length)

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Figure 10

Measured and predicted H11 results for 20-insert endmill

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Figure 11

Measured and predicted H11 results for 28-insert facemill

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Figure 12

Standard holder direct receptances for two nominally identical, geared spindles (CAT-50 holder-spindle interface). Line 1a (solid) shows the average of five measurement sets completed without removing the holder from spindle 1; line 1b (dotted) gives the average of three more spindle 1 measurements after removing and replacing the holder; line 2 (dashed) shows the average of five spindle 2 measurements

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Figure 13

Measured and predicted H11 results for 16-insert facemill. Results are shown for predictions from spindle 1 (dashed) and spindle 2 (dotted) standard holder measurements. Measurement recorded using spindle 1

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Figure 14

Measurement results for thermal shrink fit tool holder-tool blank case study. (Top panel) 30 different carbide blanks were sequentially inserted and the tool point receptance recorded. (Bottom panel) The spindle displacement-to-force receptance identified using the standard holder

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Figure 15

Measured and predicted H11 results for four different overhang lengths (132.1, 106.7, 94.0, and 76.2 mm). The overhang length for each of the four results is identified. Predictions were completed using the flexible/damped connection (connection parameters are provided in Table 8)

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Figure 16

Example stability lobes (50% radial immersion up-milling cut using a four-flute cutter with cutting force coefficients of 800N∕mm2 and 0.3) developed using measured (solid line) and predicted (dotted line) H11 results for 94.0 mm overhang length

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Figure 2

Two-component assembly. The component responses are coupled through a rigid connection to give the assembly receptance(s)

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Figure 1

Previous two-component RCSA model. An external force, Fa(t), is applied to the free end of the tool (A) to determine the assembly Xa∕Fa receptance. The tool is coupled to the machine-spindle-holder (B) through springs and dampers

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