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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Systematical Characterization of Material Response to Microscale Laser Shock Peening

[+] Author and Article Information
Hongqiang Chen, Youneng Wang, Jeffrey W. Kysar, Y. Lawrence Yao

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 126(4), 740-749 (Feb 04, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1811115 History: Received February 01, 2004; Revised August 02, 2004; Online February 04, 2005
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Laser shock-peening process
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Sample geometry and laser shock-peening condition (X-ray measurement points are along a line perpendicular to a shocked line and within ±100 μm from the center of a shocked line, d=5 μm, within ±20 μm from the shocked line center, d=10 μm, elsewhere; EBSD scan area is 100 μm×150 μm).
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Typical FEM simulation result of strain distribution in depth direction, Al (001) sample: 200×80 μm as shown; total simulation region is 800×400 μm, deformation factor=5 for viewing clarity.
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Typical lattice rotation field on cross section after laser shock peening, Al (110) sample: 200×100 μm as shown; total simulation region is 800×400 μm.
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3D X-ray profile spatial distribution across the shocked line for (002) reflection of Al (001) sample 24(x-axis: distance from the shocked line center (μm); y-axis: Bragg angle (deg); and z-axis: normalized diffraction intensity)
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Two cross sections of Fig. 7 measured at position at the center of shocked line and at unshocked position (100 μm away from the shock line center)
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3D X-ray profile spatial distribution across the shocked line for (220) reflection of Al (110) sample (x-axis: distance from the shocked line center (μm); y-axis: Brag angle (deg); and z-axis: normalized diffraction intensity)
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Two cross sections of Fig. 6 measured at position at the center for shocked line, and at unshocked position (100 μm away from the shock line center)
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Detailed view of decomposition of an asymmetric line profile into the sum of two symmetric subprofiles, diffraction intensity normalized (subprofile Ic: cell interior; and subprofile Iw: cell wall)
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Typical spatial distribution of residual stress in Al (001) sample surface by X-ray diffraction measurement and FEM simulation
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ln(An) versus n2 lines at different position from the center of shocked line for Al (002) reflection 27(An: the real part of corrected Fourier coefficient; and n: Fourier series number)
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Standard strain deviation in depth direction by Fourier transformation and FEM simulation for sample (001)
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Lattice rotation contour map on sample surface for Al (001) sample (line 1–2: two cross sections with spacing=34 μm)
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Lattice rotation contour map on sample surface for Al(110) sample (line 1–2: two cross sections with spacing=34 μm)
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Spatially distribution of lattice rotation on sample surface from simulation
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Initial slope of An versus n curves for Al (110) sample
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Spatial distribution of average mosaic size from initial slope analysis by FFT and shock-induced strengthening effects for Al (110)
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Mosaic microstructure distribution of Al (110) sample on shocked-peened surface measured with EBSD (50 μm×80 μm). Three cross sections perpendicular to the shocked line are indicated by 1, 2, and 3 27.
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Spatial distribution of average mosaic size calculated by the Scherrer formula for Al (110)
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Volume percentage of cell wall at each measure point for Al (001) and (110)
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Cross-slip formation of FCC metal, (111) planes in the 〈110〉 directions

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