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TECHNICAL PAPERS

High Precision Microscale Bending by Pulsed and CW Lasers

[+] Author and Article Information
X. Richard Zhang, Xianfan Xu

School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1288

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 125(3), 512-518 (Jul 23, 2003) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1580528 History: Received July 01, 2001; Revised December 01, 2002; Online July 23, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Experimental setup 1. Laser, 2. shutter, 3. polarizing beam splitter, 4. mirror, 5. beam expander, 6. x-y scanner, 7. specimen, 8. beam splitter, 9. position sensitive detector, 10. lens, 11. He-Ne laser
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Bending angle of ceramics as a function of laser intensity. For pulsed laser, v=3.25 mm/s,d=55 μm; for CW laser, v=130 mm/s,d=40 μm.
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Bending angle of ceramics as a function of scanning speed. For pulsed laser, P=1.75×107W/cm2,d=55 μm; for CW laser, P=3.98×105W/cm2,d=40 μm.
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Additional bending angle of ceramics as a function of the number of laser scanning lines. For pulsed laser, P=1.75×107W/cm2,v=3.25 mm/s,d=55 μm; for CW laser, P=3.98×105W/cm2,v=130 mm/s,d=40 μm.
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Bending angle of ceramics as a function of distance between adjacent scanning lines. For pulsed laser, P=1.75×107W/cm2,v=3.25 mm/s,d=55 μm; for CW laser, P=3.98×105W/cm2,v=130 mm/s,d=40 μm.
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BSE images of ceramic specimen surface after (a) pulsed laser bending, P=1.75×107W/cm2,v=13 mm/s,d=55 μm, and (b) CW laser bending, P=3.98×105W/cm2,v=130 mm/s,d=40 μm.
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Al and Ti weight percent changes versus (a) number of pulsed laser scanning lines, P=1.75×107W/cm2,v=13 mm/s,d=55 μm, and (b) CW laser intensity, v=130 mm/s,d=40 μm.
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Bending angle of silicon as a function of laser intensity at v=3.25 mm/s. For pulsed laser, d=55 μm; For CW laser, d=40 μm.
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Bending angle of stainless steel as a function of laser intensity. For pulsed laser, v=195 mm/s,d=55 μm; for CW laser, v=8 mm/s,d=40 μm.
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Mesh for the 3D simulation of CW laser bending (laser irradiates on the z=0 surface)
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Transient temperature distributions along the z-direction induced by a laser pulse. P=1.54×106W/cm2,d=55 μm.
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Simulation results of pulsed laser bending. P=1.54×106W/cm2,v=195 mm/s,d=55 μm. (a) Residual stress and off-plane displacement distributions along the x-direction; (b) residual stress and strain distributions along the z-direction.
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Simulation results of CW laser bending simulation. P=1.59×105W/cm2,v=8 mm/s,d=80 μm. (a) Residual stress distributions along the x-direction; (b) residual stress and strain distributions along the z-direction.

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