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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Sliver Generation Reduction in Trimming of Aluminum Autobody Sheet

[+] Author and Article Information
Ming Li

Alcoa Technical Center, Alcoa, Inc., Alcoa Center, PA 15069

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 125(1), 128-137 (Mar 04, 2003) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1540113 History: Received February 01, 2001; Revised March 01, 2002; Online March 04, 2003
Copyright © 2003 by ASME
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References

Daniel, D., Shahani, R., Baldo, R., and Hoffmann, J. L., 1999, “Development of 6xxx Aluminum Sheet for Autobody Outer Panels: Bake Hardening, Formability and Trimming Performance,” SAE Technical Paper Series, 1999-01-3195.
Li, M., and Fata, G., 1999, “Sliver Reduction in Trimming Aluminum Autobody Sheet,” SAE Technical Paper Series, 1999-01-0661.
Chang,  T. M., and Swift,  H. W., 1950, “Shearing of Metal Bars,” J. Inst. Met., 78, pp. 119–146.
Johnson, W., and Slater, R. A. C., 1967, “Survey of Slow and Fast Blanking of Metals at Ambient and High Temperatures,” Proc. Int. Conf. “Manufacturing Technology, CIRP-ASTME, pp. 825–851.
Johnson,  W., Ghosh,  S. K., and Reid,  S. R., 1980, “Piercing and Hole-Flanging of Sheet Metals: A Survey,” Memoires Scientifiques Revue Netallurgie, 77, pp. 585–606.
Noble,  C. F., and Oxley,  P. L. B., 1964, “Crack Formation in Blanking and Piercing,” Int. J. Prod. Res., 2, 265–274.
Atkins,  A. G., 1980, “On Cropping and Related Process,” Int. J. Mech. Sci., 22, pp. 215–231.
Dodd,  B., 1983, “Shear Instabilities in Blanking and Related Process,” Met. Technol. (London), 10, pp. 57–60.
Dood,  B., and Atkins,  A. G., 1983, “Flow Localization in Shear Deformation of Void-Containing and Void-Free Solids,” Acta Metall., 31, pp. 9–15.
Zhou,  Q., and Wierzbicki,  T., 1996, “A Tension Zone Model of Blanking And Tearing of Ductile Metal Plate,” Int. J. Mech. Sci., 38, pp. 303–324.
Kasuga,  Y., Tsutsumi,  S., and Mori,  T., 1978, “On the Shearing Process of Ductile Metals,” Bull. JSME, 21, pp. 753–760.
Atkins,  A. G., 1981, “Surface Produced by Guillotining,” Philos. Mag. A, 43, pp. 627–641.
Taupin,  E., Breitling,  J., Wu,  W. T., and Altan,  T, 1996, “Material Fracture and Burr Formation in Blanking Results of FEM Simulations and Comparison with Experiments,” J. Mater. Process. Technol., 59, pp. 68–78.
Hobbs, R. M., and Duncan, J. L., 1979, “Cutting, Piercing, Blanking and Fine Blanking,” Sheet Metal Forming, Harvey, P. D., ed., Materials Engineering Institute, ASM.
Lange, K., 1985, Handbook of Metal Forming, McGraw-Hill, New York.
Semiatin, S. L., et al., 1988, Metals Handbook: Forming and Forging, Vol. 14, ASM, Metals Park, Ohio.
Li,  M., 2000, “An Experimental Investigation on Cut Surface and Burr in Trimming Aluminum Autobody Sheet,” Int. J. Mech. Sci., 42, pp. 889–906.
Li, M., and Fata, G., 1998, “Trimmed Aluminum,” U.S. Patent 5,820,999.
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Figures

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Optical micrograph of a piece of hair-like sliver generated in a production line
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Sliver damaged aluminum hood outer panels
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Clearance, blade sharpness and cutting angle are parameters considered
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Schematic of the trends of cutting angle effects for aluminum and steel sheets
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Schematic of the trends of clearance effects with optimal cutting angles for aluminum and steel sheets
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Schematic of the trends of blade sharpness effects with optimal cutting angles for aluminum and steel sheets
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Microstructure difference between aluminum and steel sheets. Aluminum sheets contain appreciable amount of constituent particles.
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Schematic trimming configurations of the conventional (above) and the new (below)
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Optical micrographs of the first type sliver: (a) the smooth and shiny surface side, (b) the rough surface side. Note that the picture background is the adhesive cellophane tape.
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Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) micrograph of the rough fracture surface of a first type sliver
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Sketch illustrating the “part” and the “scrap” of a trimmed sheet
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Two pieces of first type slivers barely hanging-on the edge of a “scrap.” The micrograph views from the top-down direction, as shown schematically. The smooth and shiny surface of the slivers resulted from contact with blade.
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Two pieces of first type slivers barely hanging-on the edge of a “scrap.” The micrograph views from the bottom-up direction, as shown schematically. The rough surface of the slivers is fracture surface.
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Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) micrograph of the fracture surface of a first type sliver hanging-on the edge of a “scrap.”
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Optical micrograph of the cross-section (as-polished) of an interrupted test specimen showing a C-shaped crack formed in the sheet. The dark area was occupied by the blade. The light area is the sheet material being trimmed half-way.
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Optical micrographs of a second type sliver: (a) generated in the lab, (b) generated in a production line. Note that the picture background is the adhesive cellophane tape.
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Origins of the second type sliver: cutting blade interaction with the secondary burnish area of the cut surface on a “part.” The micrograph views the cut surface from the direction as schematically shown. A second type sliver still attached to the secondary burnish area.
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Origins of the second type sliver: cutting blade rubbing-off from the burr area of the cut surface on a “part.” The micrograph views the cut surface from the direction as schematically shown. Two pieces of second type sliver still attached to the burr area.
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(a) Morphology of the third type sliver, as indicated by the arrows. Note that the picture background is the adhesive cellophane tape. (b) Two pieces of third type slivers still attached to the cut surface of a “part.”

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