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Research Papers

An Efficient and Economical Rapid-Tooling Method for Die-Sinking Electrical Discharge Machining

[+] Author and Article Information
Lin Gu

 School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Systems and Vibration, Shanghai 200240, China; Center for Nontraditional Manufacturing Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68588lgu@sjtu.edu.cn

Lei Li, Wansheng Zhao

 School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, State Key Laboratory of Mechanical Systems and Vibration, Shanghai 200240, China

Kamlakar P. Rjaurkar

 Center for Nontraditional Manufacturing Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 133(5), 051004 (Sep 22, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004849 History: Received February 10, 2011; Revised July 21, 2011; Published September 22, 2011; Online September 22, 2011

This paper reports on the efficiency and economy of bundled electrode in die-sinking electrical discharge machining (EDM). Bundled electrode was fabricated by putting several thin tubular or cylindrical cell electrodes together and forming an approximate 3D end-face geometry by adjusting the length of each cell electrode. This method of electrode design and fabrication significantly reduced the fabrication time and cost compared to that of traditional cutting method. The bundled electrode allows better flushing of dielectric fluid to facilitate removal of more heat and debris from the inter electrode gap. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the advantages of bundled electrode in rough machining with large peak current. It was also found that the relative higher tool wear ratio could be reduced by using graphite cell electrodes. Additionally, time and cost of tools preparation as well as the machining time between EDM with bundled electrode and solid die-sinking electrode were compared by machining a 3-blade cavity component.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Bundled electrode and its end surface

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Figure 2

Comparison of MRR and TWR of EDM with bundled electrode and solid electrode

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Figure 3

Temperature shift curves measured under the workpiece surfaces. (a) Machining with bundled electrode (Ip : 45 A). (b) Machining with solid electrode with tool jumping (Ip : 45 A). (c) Machining with solid electrode without tool jumping (Ip : 40.4 A).

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Figure 4

Workpiece section profiles machined by bundled electrode EDM and solid electrode EDM with tool jumping

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Figure 5

Model of EDM with multi-hole inner-flushing

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Figure 6

Simulation result of multi-hole inner-flushing: (a) flushing simulation at 100 μm distance to electrode and (b) flushing simulation at 200 μm distance to electrode

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Figure 7

Influence of dielectric inlet velocities on MRR and TWR of graphite bundled electrode

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Figure 8

Influence of peak current on MRR and TWR

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Figure 9

3-D model of electrode and fabricated electrodes

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Figure 10

Comparison of 3D cavities machined by using bundled electrode and solid electrode

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