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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Investigation of Temperature at Tool-Chip Interface in Turning Using Two-Color Pyrometer

[+] Author and Article Information
Mahfudz Al Huda, Keiji Yamada, Akira Hosokawa, Takashi Ueda

Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-8667, Japan

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 124(2), 200-207 (Apr 29, 2002) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1455641 History: Received May 01, 2000; Revised September 01, 2001; Online April 29, 2002
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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References

Takeyama,  H., and Murata,  R., 1963, “Basic Investigation of Tool Wear,” ASME J. Eng. Ind., 85, pp. 33.
Balint,  J. J., and Brown,  R. H., 1964, “A Note on the Investigation of Rake Face Tool Wear,” Int. J. Mach. Tool Des. Res., 4, pp. 117–122.
Usui,  E., Shirakashi,  T., and Kitagawa,  T., 1978, “Analytical Prediction of Three Dimensional Cutting Process. Part 3: Cutting Temperature and Creater Wear of Carbide Tool,” ASME J. Eng. Ind., 100, pp. 236–243.
Gottwein,  K., 1925, “Die Messung der Schneidentemperatur beim Abdrehen von Flusseisen,” Maschinenbau, 4, pp. 1129–1135.
Shore,  H., 1925, “Thermoelectric Measurement of Cutting Tool Temperature,” J. Wash. Acad. Sci., 15, pp. 85–88.
Herbert,  E. G., 1926, “The Measurement of Cutting Temperatures,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., 1, pp. 289–329.
Reichenbach,  G. S., 1958, “Experimental Measurement of Metal Cutting Temperature Distribution,” Trans. ASME, 80, pp. 525.
Qureshi,  A. H., and Koenigsberger,  F., 1966, “An Investigation into the Problem of Measuring the Temperature Distribution on the Rake Face of a Cutting Tool,” CIRP Ann., 14, pp. 189–199.
Barrow,  G., 1973, “A Review of Experimental and Theoretical Techniques for Assessing Cutting Temperatures,” CIRP Ann., 22, No. 2, pp. 203–211.
Müller-Hummel,  P., and Lahres,  M., 1995, “Temperature Measurement on Diamond-Coated Tools during Machining,” Ind. Diamond Rev., 55, No. 265, pp. 78–83.
Kottentstette,  J. P., 1986, “Measuring Tool-Chip Interface Temperatures,” ASME J. Eng. Ind., 108, pp. 101–104.
Ueda,  T., Iriyama,  T., and Sugita,  T., 1995, “Measurement of Flush Temperature of Ceramics Irradiated with CO2 Laser-Application of Two-Color Pyrometer Using Fused Fiber Coupler,” Journal of JSPE, 61, No. 2, pp. 278–282 (in Japanese).
Ueda,  T., Sato,  M., Sugita,  T., and Nakayama,  K., 1995, “Thermal Behavior of Cutting Grain in Grinding,” CIRP Ann., 44, No. 1, pp. 325–328.
Ueda,  T., Yamada,  K., and Nakayama,  K., 1997, “Temperature of Work Materials Irradiated with CO2 Laser,” CIRP Ann., 46, No. 1, pp. 117–122.
Ueda,  T., Sato,  M., and Nakayama,  K., 1998, “The Temperature of a Single Crystal Diamond Tool in Turning,” CIRP Ann., 47, No. 1, pp. 41–44.
Ueda,  T., Al Huda,  M., Yamada,  K., and Nakayama,  K., 1999, “Temperature Measurement of CBN Tool in Turning of High Hardness Steel,” CIRP Ann., 48, No. 1, pp. 63–66.
Ueda,  T., Kanada,  Y., Sato,  M., and Sugita,  T., 1992, “Measurement of Machining Temperature Using Infrared Radiation Pyrometer with Optical Fiber (Characteristics of Pyrometer),” Trans. Jpn. Soc. Mech. Eng., Ser. C, 58, No. 545, pp. 302–309 (in Japanese).
Konenberg, M., 1966, Machining Science and Application, Theory and Practice for Operation and Development of Machining Process, Pergamon Press, Oxford.
Shaw, M. C., 1984, Metal Cutting Principle, Oxford Press, New York.
Tay,  A. O., Stevenson,  M. G., and de Vahl Davis,  G., 1974, “Using the Finite Element Method to Determine Temperature Distributions in Orthogonal Machining,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., 188, pp. 627–638.
Tay,  A. O., Stevenson,  M. G., de Vahl Davis,  G., and Oxley,  O. L. B., 1976, “A Numerical Method for Calculation Temperature Distributions in Machinings, from Force and Shear Angle Measurement,” Int. J. Mach. Tool Des. Res., 16, pp. 335–349.
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Figures

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Illustration of experimental arrangement
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Illustration of optical fiber setting
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System of two-color pyrometer
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Specific detectivity (D*) of Ge and InSb cells
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Spectral transmission loss of quartz fiber
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Frequency characteristic of amplifier
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Schematic illustration of calibration set-up
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Calibration curve of the pyrometer
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Energy accepted at incidence face of the fiber
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Influence of measuring distance on measured temperature when the object has 4-th power temperature distribution
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Typical output waves from the pyrometer (V=200 m/min,d=0.8 mm, AISI 1045 (250HV1))
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Typical output wave from the strain gages (V=200 m/min,d=0.8 mm, AISI 1045 (250HV1))
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Influence of cutting speed on the temperature (f=0.2 mm/rev, Workpiece: AISI 1045 (250HV1))
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Influence of depth of cut on the temperature (f=0.2 mm/rev, Workpiece: AISI 1045 (250HV1))
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Influence of coolant on the temperature (d=0.8 mm,f=0.2 mm/rev, Work: AISI 1045 (210HV1))
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Problem regions and thermal boundary conditions for finite element calculation
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Typical element mesh of the problem regions
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Isothermal lines around cutting edge for various cutting speeds (dry, unit: °C)
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Temperature distributions at tool-chip interface for various cutting speeds (dry)
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Energy accepted by the fiber when the rake surface has temperature distribution
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Comparison between calculated results and experimental values (dry)
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Comparison between calculated results and experimental values (dry, h=0; and wet, h=21,000 W/(m2⋅K))
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Comparison between maximum temperatures at the interface and experimental values (dry)

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