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Technical Briefs

A Micro Investigation Into Electro Discharge Machining Industrial Applications Processing Parameters and Product Surface Profile Using Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Feed Drive

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Shafik

Senior Lecturer Mem. ASME Faculty of Arts, Design and Technology,  University of Derby, Derby DE22 3AW, UKm.shafik@derby.ac.uk

H. S. Abdalla

Professor Fellow IMech Faculty of Art and Design,  University of Sharjah, P.O. Box 27272, Sharjah, UAEhabdalla@sharjah.ac.ae

T. J. Wilmshurst

Fellow IET Faculty of Arts, Design and Technology,  University of Derby, Derby DE22 3AW, UKT.J.Wilmshurst@derby.ac.uk

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 133(4), 044503 (Aug 18, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004687 History: Received May 06, 2010; Revised July 16, 2011; Published August 18, 2011; Online August 18, 2011

This paper presents a micro investigation into electrodischarge-machining system, using piezoelectric ultrasonic motor feed drive. The drive was designed to improve the electrodischarge-machining servo control system stability of machining, quality of surface profiles of the machined products, and system dynamic time response. Research has been undertaken to examine the developed servo control feed drive in two industrial applications, electrodischarge-machining, and electrodischarge-texturing. Two arrangements were used, in this investigation. The existing servo control feed drive system, which uses a dc servomotor, and the developed system, which uses piezoelectric feed drive. The electrodischarge machining parameters including current level, on-off time, and duty cycle of the machining pulse were the main machining parameters of this investigation. The electron microscopic micro investigation into the machined samples showed that: piezoelectric ultrasonic feed drive showed a clear improvement in the quality of surface finish of the machined samples, due to the fast dynamic time response of the ultrasonic feed drive. This was accompanied by a notable reduction in the arcing and short-circuiting teething processes. This was verified by examining the electrode movements, the variations in the interelectrode gap voltage, current, and feedback control signals.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Feedback control signal and interelectrode gap voltage variation for EDM machining using the current dc servo control system [gap current 5 A, gap voltage of 38 V, and duty cycle 8 μ s]

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Figure 2

Feedback control signal and interelectrode gap voltage variation for EDM machining using the developed piezoelectric USM servo control system [gap current 5 A, gap voltage of 38 V, and duty cycle 8 μ s]

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Figure 3

EDM surface finishes obtained using dc servo control system using current level 8 A, “on” time 50 μ s, and duty cycle 12 μ s

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Figure 4

EDM surface finishes obtained using dc servo control system using current level 10 A, on time 50 μ s, and duty cycle 12 μ s

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Figure 5

EDM surface finishes obtained using piezoelectric USM system of control using current level 10 A, on time 50 μ s, and duty cycle 12 μ s

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Figure 6

Variations of the degree of roughness against machining parameters for both systems of control using dc servomotor and piezoelectric USM

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Figure 7

Variations of material removal rate for various electromachining parameters for both systems of control using dc servomotor and piezoelectric USM

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Figure 8

Stability of the feedback control signal (top signal) and interelectrode gap voltage (bottom signal) of the EDT system using an existing dc servo control system for period of 10 s [peak current 8 A, duty cycle 12 μ s, and on time 50 μ s]

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Figure 9

EDT surface profiles obtained using dc control system and operating parameters, current 6 A, on time 50 μ s, and duty cycle 12 μ s

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Figure 10

Stability of the feedback control signal (top signal) and interelectrode gap voltage (bottom signal) of the EDT system using the developed piezoelectric control system for period of 10 s [peak current 8 A, duty cycle 12 μ s, and on time 50 μ s]

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Figure 16

Variation of the peak count against various peak currents of machining for both systems of control using dc and USM

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Figure 17

Variation of the roughness against on/off machining time for both systems of control using dc and USM

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Figure 18

Variation of the peak count against on/off machining time for both systems of control using dc and USM

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Figure 15

Variation of the roughness against various peak current of machining for both systems of control using dc and USM

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Figure 14

EDT surface profiles obtained using USM control system and operating parameters, current 6 A, on time 50 μ s, and duty cycle 12 μ s

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Figure 13

EDT surface profiles obtained using dc control system and operating parameters, current 6 A, on time 50 μ s and duty cycle 12 μ s

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Figure 12

EDT textured surface profiles obtained using USM control system and operating parameters, current 6 A, on time 50 μ s, and duty cycle 4 μ s

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Figure 11

EDT surface profiles obtained using dc control system and operating parameters, current 6 A, on time 50 μ s, and duty cycle 4 μ s

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