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Research Papers

Experimental Study of High-Frequency Vibration Assisted Micro/Mesoscale Forming of Metallic Materials

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhehe Yao

The State Key Lab of Fluid Power Transmission and Control, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027, P. R. China; Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011zhyao@zju.edu.cn

Gap-Yong Kim1

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011gykim@iastate.edu

LeAnn Faidley

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011faidley@iastate.edu

Qingze Zou

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,  Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854qzzou@rci.rutgers.edu

Deqing Mei

The State Key Lab of Fluid Power Transmission and Control, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027, P. R. Chinamedqmei@zju.edu.cn

Zichen Chen

The State Key Lab of Fluid Power Transmission and Control, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027, P. R. Chinachenzc@zju.edu.cn

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 133(6), 061009 (Dec 01, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004612 History: Received March 11, 2011; Revised July 06, 2011; Published December 01, 2011; Online December 01, 2011

Micro/mesoscale forming is a promising technology for mass production of miniature metallic parts. However, fabrication of micro/mesoscale features leads to challenges due to the friction increase at the interface and tool wear from highly localized stress. In this study, the use of high-frequency vibration for potential application in micro/mesoscale forming has been investigated. A versatile experimental setup based on a magnetostrictive (Terfenol-D) actuator was built. Vibration assisted micro/mesoscale upsetting, pin extrusion and cup extrusion were conducted to understand the effects of workpiece size, excitation frequency, and the contact condition. Results showed a change in load reduction behavior that was dependent on the excitation frequency and the contact condition. The load reduction exhibited in this study can be explained by a combination of stress superposition and friction reduction. It was found that a higher excitation frequency and a less complicated die-specimen interface were more likely to result in a friction reduction by high-frequency vibration.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Stress , Vibration , Extruding
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Figures

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Figure 1

Experimental setup for vibration assisted micro/mesoscale forming: (a) overall setup, (b) pin extrusion die, (c) cup extrusion die, (d) upsetting die, and (e) aluminum samples.

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Figure 2

The signal flow chart of the vibration assisted micro/mesoscale forming system

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Figure 3

Sweeping result of the mechanical system within the working frequency range

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Figure 4

Load–displacement curves of micro/mesoscale upsetting with an interval of superimposed vibration at (a) 6 kHz, (b) 7.5 kHz, and (c) 9 kHz

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Figure 5

Load–displacement curve of micro/mesoscale pin extrusion with three intervals of superimposed high-frequency excitation

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Figure 6

Load–displacement curve of micro/mesoscale cup extrusion with two intervals of superimposed high-frequency excitation

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Figure 7

The photograph of the samples fabricated by vibration assisted micro/mesoscale forming

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Figure 8

A schematic diagram of the oscillation model for vibration assisted forming

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Figure 9

Predicted stress field in the 2 mm-long workpiece excited by frequencies in the range of 8–2000 kHz.

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Figure 10

Predicted scaling effect on stress oscillation in the workpiece and on the relative velocity at the interfaces

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Figure 11

Predicted effect of excitation frequency on stress oscillation in the workpiece and on the relative velocity at the interfaces

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Figure 12

Predicted effect of contact stiffness on stress oscillation in the workpiece and on the relative velocity at the interfaces: (a) k = k1  = k2 and (b) varying k1 /k2 (k2  = 100 kN/mm).

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