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Research Papers

Lensed Plastic Optical Fiber with a Convexo-Concave Fiber Endface for Coupling Laser Diodes With Plastic Optical Fiber

[+] Author and Article Information
Yih-Tun Tseng

Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering,  National Sun Yat-Sen University, 70 Lien-Hai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan, R.O.C.tsengyt@mail.nsysu.edu.tw

Shu-Ming Chang, Sheng-He Huang, Wood-Hi Cheng

Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering,  National Sun Yat-Sen University, 70 Lien-Hai Road, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan, R.O.C.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 133(4), 041011 (Aug 11, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003952 History: Revised March 21, 2010; Received September 15, 2010; Published August 11, 2011; Online August 11, 2011

This work presents a novel lensed plastic optical fiber (POF), efficiently coupled with a light source. A convexo-concave plastic lens (CCPL) was bound to a flat-end plastic optical fiber using laser transmission welding (LTW) to form a convexo-concave-shaped fiber endface (CCSFE). The novel lensed plastic optical fiber has a longer working distance and a higher coupling efficiency than conventional lensed plastic optical fibers. 850 nm fiber is often used in high-power 2.5 Gb/s transmission rate. Experimental POF is perfluorinated POF, 62.5–500 μm diameter, 850∼1300 μm wavelength, 10 dB/km power loss rate, 2.5 Gb/s transmission rate. Because of the small diameter of POF, it is difficult to couple between the light source and POF. Therefore, it is important to develop a lensed fiber structure to increase the coupling efficiency. Experiments indicate that the coupling efficiency between a laser diode at a wavelength of 850 nm and a graded-index POF is as high as 85% with a long working distance of 250 μm. The measured tolerance, in relation to the lateral and vertical displacements and tilt, are satisfactory for practical active alignment.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 2

The beam propagation from a light source to the POF through air and a CCPL

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Figure 3

The scheme of ray traces parameters

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Figure 4

The skeleton of the purposed design of the CCPL

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Figure 5

The ray longitudinal aberration graph, (a) proposed design and (b) former design

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Figure 6

The diameter of the light beam that passes through the lens as a function of the x-axis displacement of the light source, (a) proposed design and (b) former design

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Figure 7

The simulation of the coupling efficiency between LD and the flat-end, the rounded-end and the proposed end POF via fiber on-axis location

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Figure 8

The scheme of the automated molding system

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Figure 9

The experimental setup used in this investigation

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Figure 10

The micrographs of the proposed CCSFE

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Figure 11

The metallograph of the intersection of the CCSFE

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Figure 12

The experimental coupling efficiency versus on-axis location of the fiber

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Figure 1

The scheme of the proposed CCSFE

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