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Research Papers

Analysis of Residual Stresses in Sustainable Cryogenic Machining of Nickel Based Alloy—Inconel 718

[+] Author and Article Information
Jani Kenda, Janez Kopac

 Faculty of Mechanical Engineering University of Ljubljana, Askerceva 6, SI 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Franci Pusavec1

 Faculty of Mechanical Engineering University of Ljubljana, Askerceva 6, SI 1000 Ljubljana, Sloveniafranci.pusavec@fs.uni-lj.si

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 133(4), 041009 (Aug 11, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004610 History: Received October 14, 2010; Revised July 13, 2011; Published August 11, 2011; Online August 11, 2011

In machining processes, surface integrity is a major quality-related performance output. In the case of difficult-to-cut materials, this frequently relates to residual stresses induced in the machined surface and subsurface. As cryogenic machining presents a sustainable alternative to conventional machining processes, in this work, cryogenic machining and the influence of cooling/lubrication conditions on the surface integrity generated during turning of Inconel 718 are presented. The results show that the cryogenic machining process generates larger compressive residual stresses, and prevail at deeper levels beneath the machined surface, thus resulting in improved product quality and performance characteristics in terms of fatigue life and wear resistance.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Kinematics of turning operation with machining directions and CLF delivery principle

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Figure 2

X-ray measuring head with the measurement setup and the corresponding angles of oscillations during the measurement procedure

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Figure 3

Residual stress measurements on and beneath the surface (in hoop and axial directions), machined under different CLF conditions and example of cryo CLF case table values with corresponding deviations

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Figure 4

Phase space of measured residual stresses on the surface and beneath the surface of machined sample (hoop and axial), machined under different cooling/lubrication conditions

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Figure 5

Diffraction peak full width at half maximum (FWHM) for different cooling/lubrication conditions and an example of cryo CLF case table values with corresponding deviations

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Figure 6

Diffraction peak width broadening with plastic work [25]: (a) broadening of (3 1 1) peak width with increasing plastic work; and (b) percent of plastic work in correlation to the FWHM.

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Figure 7

Hardness measurements beneath the machined surface (profile), under different cooling/lubrication conditions and comparison with the microstructure, and an example of cryo CLF case table values with corresponding deviations

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