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Technical Briefs

Vibration Amplitude in Rotary Ultrasonic Machining: A Novel Measurement Method and Effects of Process Variables

[+] Author and Article Information
W. L. Cong, E. Van Vleet

Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering,  Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506

Z. J. Pei1

Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering,  Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506zpei@ksu.edu

N. Mohanty

Department of Chemical Engineering,  Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506

C. Treadwell

Sonic-Mill, 7500 Bluewater Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87121

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 133(3), 034501 (Jun 02, 2011) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004133 History: Received December 23, 2009; Revised April 05, 2011; Published June 02, 2011; Online June 02, 2011

Rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM) has been used to machine both brittle and ductile materials as well as composite materials. There are numerous reported studies about the effects of various process variables on output responses. However, the current literature contains few articles about the measurement methods of vibration amplitude in RUM and about the effects of process variables on vibration amplitude. The lack of such knowledge has made it difficult to explain some experimentally observed phenomena in RUM and degraded the creditability of some experimental results with RUM. This paper, for the first time, presents a measurement method capable of measuring vibration amplitude during RUM machining. It also reports RUM experimental results on effects of cutting tool, ultrasonic power, workpiece material, tool rotation speed, and feedrate on ultrasonic amplitude. This study will fill some blanks in the literature and provide plausible explanations to some seemingly contradictory results reported in the literature.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Vibration , Machining
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Figures

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Figure 1

Illustration of rotary ultrasonic machining

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Figure 2

Measurement of vibration amplitude on a microscopic picture

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Figure 3

Measurement of vibration amplitude with the dial indicator method

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Figure 4

Five different tools used in this study

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Figure 5

Effects of the cutting tool on vibration amplitude. Workpiece material = stainless steel; ultrasonic power = 30%; feedrate = 0.015 mm/s. Tool #1: Tool rotation speed = 3000 rpm and feedrate = 0.0003 mm/rev; tool #2: Tool rotation speed = 2251 rpm and feedrate = 0.0004 mm/rev; tool #3: Tool rotation speed = 2251 rpm and feedrate = 0.0004 mm/rev; tool #4: Tool rotation speed = 1497 rpm and feedrate = 0.0006 mm/rev; and tool #5: Tool rotation speed = 1286 rpm and feedrate = 0.0007 mm/rev.

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Figure 6

Effects of ultrasonic power on vibration amplitude (measure with the dial indicator method) for five tools (#1, #2, #3, #4, and #5).

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Figure 7

Effects of ultrasonic power on vibration amplitude. Tool #1: workpiece material = stainless steel; feedrate = 0.015 mm/s (0.0003 mm/rev); and tool rotation speed = 3000 rpm.

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Figure 8

Effects of workpiece material on vibration amplitude. Tool #1: ultrasonic power = 30%; feedrate = 0.015 mm/s (0.0003 mm/rev); and tool rotation speed = 3000 rpm.

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Figure 9

Effects of tool rotation speed on vibration amplitude.Tool #1: workpiece material = stainless steel; ultrasonic power = 30%; and feedrate = 0.015 mm/s (0.0003 mm/rev).

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Figure 10

Effects of feedrate on vibration amplitude. Tool #1: ultrasonic power = 30%; tool rotation speed = 3000 rpm; and workpiece material = stainless steel.

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