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Research Papers

A Heat Transfer Model Based on Finite Difference Method for Grinding

[+] Author and Article Information
Bin Shen1

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Albert J. Shih

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Guoxian Xiao

 Manufacturing Systems Research Lab, General Motors R&D, Warren, MI 48092

1

Dr. Shen currently works for Procter & Gamble (Gillette Blades & Razors).

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 133(3), 031001 (Jun 02, 2011) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003947 History: Received October 02, 2009; Revised March 04, 2011; Published June 02, 2011; Online June 02, 2011

A heat transfer model for grinding has been developed based on the finite difference method (FDM). The proposed model can solve transient heat transfer problems in grinding, and has the flexibility to deal with different boundary conditions. The model is first validated by comparing it with the traditional heat transfer model for grinding which assumes the semiinfinite workpiece size and adiabatic boundary conditions. Then it was used to investigate the effects of workpiece size, feed rate, and cooling boundary conditions. Simulation results show that when the workpiece is short or the feed rate is low, transient heat transfer becomes more dominant during grinding. Results also show that cooling in the grinding contact zone has much more significant impact on the reduction of workpiece temperature than that in the leading edge or trailing edge. The model is further applied to investigate the convection heat transfer at the workpiece surface in wet and minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) grinding. Based on the assumption of linearly varying convection heat transfer coefficient in the grinding contact zone, FDM model is able to calculate convection coefficient from the experimentally measured grinding temperature profile. The average convection heat transfer coefficient in the grinding contact zone was estimated as 4.2 × 105 W/m2 -K for wet grinding and 2.5 × 104 W/m2 -K for MQL grinding using vitrified bond CBN wheels.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Illustration of nodal network: (a) mesh of the computation domain (workpiece) and (b) close-up view of the nodal network

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Figure 2

Illustration of the boundary conditions: (a) surface grinding process and (b) the corresponding BCs

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Figure 3

Temporal and spatial distributions of the workpiece temperature (L = 50 mm and H = 10 mm)

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Figure 4

Temporal and spatial distribution of the grinding temperature at the workpiece surface (L = 50 mm, H = 10 mm, and vw  = 2400 mm/min)

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Figure 5

Comparison of steady-state surface temperature profile

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Figure 6

Comparison of temperature rise along the z-direction (at x/l = 0)

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Figure 7

Effect of the workpiece length (L = 5 mm, H = 10 mm, and vw  = 2400 mm/min)

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Figure 8

Effect of the workpiece thickness (L = 50 mm and vw  = 2400 mm/min)

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Figure 9

Effect of the workpiece velocity (L = 50 mm, H = 10 mm, and vw  = 240 mm/min)

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Figure 10

Effect of cooling in the leading edge (surface temperature)

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Figure 11

Effect of cooling in the trailing edge (surface temperature)

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Figure 12

Effect of cooling in the contact zone (surface temperature)

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Figure 13

Experimental setup: (a) overview, (b) MQL fluid delivery device, and (c) illustration of grinding temperature measurement

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Figure 14

Temperature matching results: (a) dry grinding, (b) wet grinding, and (c) MQL grinding

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Figure 15

Assumption of convection heat transfer coefficient

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Figure 16

Convection heat transfer coefficient prediction: (a) wet grinding and (b) MQL grinding

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Figure 17

BC within the contact zone

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Figure 18

Interpretation of the surface temperature (contact zone)

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