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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Parametric Study of Heat Transfer in Injection Molding—Effect of Thermal Contact Resistance

[+] Author and Article Information
L. Sridhar, B. M. Sedlak, K. A. Narh

Department of Mechanical Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 122(4), 698-705 (Dec 01, 1999) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1287348 History: Received October 01, 1998; Revised December 01, 1999
Copyright © 2000 by ASME
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References

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Asensio,  M. C., and Seyed-Yagoobi,  J., 1993, “Simulation of Paper-Drying Systems With Incorporation of an Experimental Drum-Paper Thermal Contact Conductance Relationship,” J. Energy Resour. Technol., 115, pp. 291–300.
Attia,  M. H., and Osman,  M. O. M., 1993, “Thermal Response of Metallic Moulds to Thermoelastic Interaction at Its Mould Inner Boundary,” J. Eng. Industry, 113, No. 4, pp. 434–444.
Ruan,  Y., Liu,  J. C., and Richmond,  O., 1994, “Determining the Unknown Cooling Condition and Contact Heat Transfer Coefficient During the Solidification of Alloys,” Inverse Prob. Eng., 1, pp. 45–69.
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Yu,  C. J., Sunderland,  J. E., and Poli,  C., 1990, “Thermal Contact Resistance in Injection Molding,” Polym. Eng. Sci., 30, No. 24, pp. 1599–1605.
Kamal,  M. R., Mutel,  A. T., Salloum,  G., and Garcia-Rejon,  A., 1991, “Heat Transfer Measurement at the Mold Surface During Injection Molding of Thermoplastic Melts,” Soc. Plastics Eng.-Ann. Tech. Conf. (SPE-ANTEC) Technical Papers, 36, pp. 483–487.
Narh,  K. A., and Sridhar,  L., 1997, “Measurement and Modeling of Thermal Contact Resistance at a Plastic Metal Interface,” Soc. Plastics Eng.-Ann. Tech. Conf. (SPE-ANTEC) Technical Papers, 43, pp. 2273–2277.
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Chiang,  H. H., Himasekhar,  K., Santhanam,  N., and Wang,  K. K., 1993, “Integrated Simulation of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Injection Molding for the Prediction of Shrinkage and Warpage,” J. Eng. Mater. Technol., 115, pp. 37–47.
Sridhar,  L., and Narh,  K. A., 1998, “Computer Simulation of the Effect of Thermal Contact Resistance on Cooling Time in Injection Molding,” Simulation, 73, No. 3, pp. 144–148.
Madhusudana, C. V., 1996, Thermal Contact Conductance, Springer-Verlag, New York.
Battey,  D. J., and Gupta,  M., 1997, “A Parametric Study of Sink Marks in Injection Molded Parts Using the Finite Element Method,” Int. Polym. Process., 12, pp. 288–299.
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
(a) Model A: A model of an ASTM tensile test specimen showing the mid-plane mesh, cooling channels, runner and gate. For line a-a consult text under “Simulation Results/Shrinkage Analysis.” (b) Model B: A model of a box with partitions showing the runner system. For line b-b consult text under “Simulation Results/Shrinkage Analysis.” (c) Model C: A model of an electronic remote controller cover showing the runner and gate.
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Thickness direction average temperature in models A (for two different values of part thickness) and B at a specified location, plotted at different instants in the molding cycle with the two values of TCR (Rc). Refer to Table 2 for model designations. The broken horizontal line corresponds to 110°C—a typical ejection temperature for PS. Note the differences in the cycle time for the two values of TCR used (broken vertical lines).
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Thickness direction temperature distribution in models A at the end of filling, and at the end of postfilling, for the two values of TCR. Rc values are in m2 -K/W.
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(a) Plot of the variation of gate and cavity pressure with time at a specific location in the model, for all the models under base condition (refer to Table 2). Solid lines represent the gate pressure and dashed lines represent the cavity pressure at the indicated nodes. Time refers to instant in one cycle. (b) Plot of the variation of gate and cavity pressure against normalized time (normalized with respect to cycle time). Solid lines represent the gate pressure and dashed lines represent the cavity pressure at the indicated nodes.
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Plot of the cavity pressure against time for model A, for different processing conditions (refer to Table 2). Solid lines represent the gate pressure and dashed lines represent the cavity pressure at the indicated nodes.
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Plot of the mid-plane deflection along “a-a,” “b-b” and “c-c” of model A(A1), B and C, respectively (see Fig. 1) due to shrinkage for analysis conditions of Tables 1 and 2.
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(a) Formation of gap and evolution of the gap resistance plotted against the cycle time for the temperature data obtained from analysis for model A (A1). The computation is done at the node indicated on the mid-plane in Fig. 1(a). (b) Formation of gap and evolution of the gap resistance plotted against the cycle time for the temperature data obtained from analysis for model B. The computation is done at the node indicated on the mid-plane in Fig. 1(b).
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A simulation of the part surface and mold wall showing the nonuniform gap due to superposition of mid-plane shrinkage on the thickness direction shrinkage.

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