0
RESEARCH PAPERS

A Solidification Front Monitor for Metal Casting

[+] Author and Article Information
M. M. Hytros

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139

J.-H. Chun, N. Saka

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139

R. C. Lanza

Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 120(3), 515-522 (Aug 01, 1998) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2830154 History: Received May 01, 1996; Revised February 01, 1997; Online January 17, 2008

Abstract

A feasibility study was performed to assess computed tomography (CT) as a method of detecting the position of the solidification front during metal casting. Since the liquid and solid phases of metals differ in density by 4 to 12 percent, CT has the ability to differentiate the two phases. The motivation for this work is the development of a real-time solidification sensor for the continuous casting of metals. A first-generation CT system for reconstructing two-dimensional images of solidifying tin was developed. The performance of the CT system was evaluated by reconstructing images of objects of known geometries. For the solidification experiment, CT scans were conducted on an actively heated and cooled crucible filled with pure tin. The tin existed in both liquid and solid phases, with the solidification front position tracked by thermocouples. The image of the two-phase tin experiment had poor contrast resolution, but a quantitative analysis of the image does indicate an approximate 7 percent difference between the liquid and the solid portions of the melt. However, the size of the liquid phase was not as large as that determined by thermocouple measurements. This is a result of temperature fluctuations in the melt during data acquisition, as well as the relatively low spatial resolution. Future work to improve system performance will include using a linear accelerator (linac) as the radiation source.

Copyright © 1998 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In